Heart Health

Research into the health benefits of peanuts has linked a variety of nutrients – including fiber, vitamin E and magnesium – to a reduced risk of heart disease. Read about how peanuts and peanut butter can fit into a heart-healthy lifestyle.

3 Benefits of Eating Well That Have Nothing to do with Your Weight

Take a moment to ask yourself: What motivates me to eat well? 

If your key motivators behind eating a healthy diet are weight control and/or weight loss, you are not alone. As a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), I notice the driving force behind many people’s desire to develop a healthier diet is typically weight-focused. 

But there are often forgotten physical and mental health benefits of eating a balanced, varied and nutrient-dense diet– that have nothing to do with your body size:

Here’s The Truth About Omega-6s

From our social media feeds to morning news shows, there’s nutrition advice thrown at us everyday.  

The truth is, nutrition science is constantly evolving, which is why it is important to seek information backed by rigorous science.

Recently, diets like Whole30 caution about foods rich in omega-6 fatty acids, like peanuts, peanut butter, seeds and liquid vegetable oils (i.e. corn, sunflower and safflower oils). And greater emphasis is typically placed on benefits of eating omega-3 fatty acids.

Peanuts & Your Heart

Since 2003, peanuts have a qualified health claim that says: Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, including peanuts, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.

That’s powerful stuff, since heart disease remains the number one killer in Americans. And research linking what we eat to our heart health continues to grow! But in the world of nutrition research, there is only one constant – change. As soon as a conclusion is drawn from one study, there will be another study with a different result. BUT studies continue to prove the link between peanut consumption and reduced risk of heart disease.

5 Recipes to Wake Up with Peanut Milk

The first-ever peanut milk has finally hit the market, and it can literally be used at every single meal (and snack!). Naturally, we thought we would start with breakfast recipes, and show you how to use peanut milk as soon as you greet the day.

4 Plant-Forward Recipes You Have to Try This Fall

Vegetables are so hot right now.

Seriously, all the trendy restaurant chefs are doing something amazing with vegetables – making them taste good. The good news is you can do that right in your own kitchen.

Why Peanuts Fit in Your Healthy Diet for Life

As we age, nutrition becomes a key factor in maintaining good health from the inside, out. Enter the perfectly powerful peanut. Research has confirmed that peanuts provide the body protective benefits that are essential for healthy aging.

Get the Dirt on Clean Eating

Search the hashtag “cleaneating” on Instagram and you will find images of super-lean women taking mirror selfies at the gym. There are also photos of low-calorie, “ice-cream” and “milkshakes,” plates of only vegetables, and a bunch of guys’ washboard abs.   All of these photos are sending the same message: Eat clean, and you’ll be a much more attractive person with a better life than the one you already have – the one you have while you’re eating … dirty.

Snacking on Peanuts Every Day linked to Lower Risk of Stroke, Other Diseases, study shows

Strokes cause one out of every 20 deaths in America. And in an analysis of 20 studies, grabbing a daily handful of peanuts was associated with a decreased stroke risk.

 

5 Simple Tips to Move Plant-Forward

Did you know that eating more plants can help your health and the environment simultaneously?

It’s true. Eating more plants and plant-based foods like peanuts is linked to better health for both you and the world around you. Going plant-forward is simply eating more plant-based foods without eliminating animal products. 

It’s Simple: Peanuts Are Healthy

We all know, pretty much, what healthy means, right? Per the dictionary, something is healthy if it is “indicative of, conducive to, or promoting good health”. The great thing about a term like this is its simplicity. If we all have the same basic definition for healthy, we can easily decide what foods we should eat more often and what foods we should only eat on occasion. The word healthy is helpful when making food choices. 

    

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